Zenxmed Logo

Delivering exceptional care to patients.

The Process

Zenxmed was started by physicians who were acutely aware of the rising cost of healthcare in North America and the increasing volume of medical information that was changing daily. Overworked, under-resourced and frustrated by the industries inability to advocate on behalf of practicing physicians, they wanted a resource that served their needs and allowed them to stay on-top of current medical practices.

 
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Delivering exceptional care to patients.

The Process

Zenxmed was started by physicians who were acutely aware of the rising cost of healthcare in North America and the increasing volume of medical information that was changing daily. Overworked, under-resourced and frustrated by the industries inability to advocate on behalf of practicing physicians, they wanted a resource that served their needs and allowed them to stay on-top of current medical practices.

 

My Involvement & Role

In my first year, I led a team of designers and developers through a user-centred design process that covered research, several iterative design sprints with user testing to evaluate their efficacy, and various other activities involving the vision, branding and formation of Zenxmed’s brand.

In my second year, I became product owner, managing the project sprints and roadmap along with design and UX.

 
 

The Process

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Qualitative Research

We interviewed more than two dozen physicians and surveyed over a hundred across North America, with the goal to better understand how they worked in their respective environments, what their frustrations were, what resources they had and what they might needed.

Then we completed a competitive analysis of top evidence-based medical resources, evaluating them on various criteria like onboarding and use, practice changing updates, drug interaction information, access to references and/or supporting evidence.

 
 

The qualitative data from this allowed us to formulate hypotheses about their working environment and learning habits, how they access clinical resources, what they find frustrating about the current medical landscape and what tools are available.

We discovered that 86.8% of our audience used the leading clinical resource over others, but only used it on average once a day.

When we dug deeper, we found that physicians use UpToDate for unusual or more nuanced decision-making, situations where specialists might step in. Cost is a notable component, as this is the most expensive clinical resource. Lastly, time is a factor. The vast amount of information available via UpToDate is not tailored for mobile or situations where it can be used for quick answers.

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Survey Results
 
 

The Process

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Qualitative Research

The qualitative data from this allowed us to formulate hypotheses about their working environment and learning habits, how they access clinical resources, what they find frustrating about the current medical landscape and what tools are available.

We discovered that 86.8% of our audience used the leading clinical resource over others, but only used it on average once a day.

When we dug deeper, we found that physicians use UpToDate for unusual or more nuanced decision-making, situations where specialists might step in. Cost is a notable component, as this is the most expensive clinical resource. Lastly, time is a factor. The vast amount of information available via UpToDate is not tailored for mobile or situations where it can be used for quick answers.

The qualitative data from this allowed us to formulate hypotheses about their working environment and learning habits, how they access clinical resources, what they find frustrating about the current medical landscape and what tools are available.

We discovered that 86.8% of our audience used the leading clinical resource over others, but only used it on average once a day.

When we dug deeper, we found that physicians use UpToDate for unusual or more nuanced decision-making, situations where specialists might step in. Cost is a notable component, as this is the most expensive clinical resource. Lastly, time is a factor. The vast amount of information available via UpToDate is not tailored for mobile or situations where it can be used for quick answers.

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Survey Results
 
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We just don’t have the capacity to remember everything we've learned…plus all the newest updates to guidelines…for every patient on the spot.
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Exploration

Our personas were distilled down to what our users' goals and behaviours were. Adding also what “We must” and “Must never do” in context to the user we discovered that Physicians, Medical Residents and Students were to be at the forefront. We mapped out user journeys to further highlight where Openxmed would come into use. Then defined our hypothesis:

Hypothesis 1 - If Physicians were able to find and navigate through dense clinical guidelines quickly, they would be less inclined to make guesses at point of care.

Hypothesis 2 - Physicians enjoy the prestige and recognition of being published, so switching from the traditional authorship sensibility to contributor would motivate more physicians to engage amongst peers and share a high-level of accountability in how medicine is published and practiced. 

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We just don’t have the capacity to remember everything we learned…plus all the newest updates to guidelines…for every patient on the spot.
Image

Exploration

Our personas were distilled down to what our users' goals and behaviours were. Adding also what “We must” and “Must never do” in context to the user we discovered that Physicians, Medical Residents and Students were to be at the forefront. We mapped out user journeys to further highlight where Openxmed would come into use. Then defined our hypothesis:

Hypothesis 1 - If Physicians were able to find and navigate through dense clinical guidelines quickly, they would be less inclined to make guesses at point of care.

Hypothesis 2 - Physicians enjoy the prestige and recognition of being published, so switching from the traditional authorship sensibility to contributor would motivate more physicians to engage amongst peers and share a high-level of accountability in how medicine is published and practiced. 

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We just don’t have the capacity to remember everything we learned…plus all the newest updates to guidelines…for every patient on the spot.
Image

Exploration

Our personas were distilled down to what our users' goals and behaviours were. Adding also what “We must” and “Must never do” in context to the user we discovered that Physicians, Medical Residents and Students were to be at the forefront. We mapped out user journeys to further highlight where Openxmed would come into use. Then defined our hypothesis:

Hypothesis 1 - If Physicians were able to find and navigate through dense clinical guidelines quickly, they would be less inclined to make guesses at point of care.

Hypothesis 2 - Physicians enjoy the prestige and recognition of being published, so switching from the traditional authorship sensibility to contributor would motivate more physicians to engage amongst peers and share a high-level of accountability in how medicine is published and practiced. 

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Design

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The Mobile App

Our aim with Openxmed was to ensure that users could navigate through large amounts of content quickly, in a logical order, based on decisions they would make when with a patient.

We established a decision tree model allowing us to layer additional information and references into the content, reducing the cognitive load for the physicians at point-of-care.

Another key component was the ability to comment on the evidence. This proved particularly helpful for the medical students we tested with because it allowed them to connect and engage with peers and with other physicians. Unlike existing clinical decision making tools, engagement between physicians is often missing or it’s an afterthought, which is why we ensured each user had a robust profile, highlighting their specialty or area of practice, their medical interests and where they received their medical degree. These social cues among the medical ‘elite’ are important to ensure the integrity of the platform.

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We crafted the onboarding process to verify each user, as the platform is only open to practicing physicians, medical students and residents. This involved making primary fields such as first and last name mandatory and the secondary fields, like phone number (optional). We also made it clear to the user why we were asking for their information, to help them understand that weren’t planning to do anything else other than verify them for our platform.

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The Openxmed CMS

Once we figured out how we were going to help our users navigate medical content from a mobile device at point-of-care, we built out the backend and content delivery platform.

Early on, we opted to roll this out in 2 phases. Since we were already getting interest from physicians and medical students to contribute to the platform, we needed to start the content creation process without a content management system. To do this we used a free online flow diagram tool (draw.io) and a clear format for our content contributors to follow as they embarked on content creation. The objective was to have 100 algorithms completed in 6 months.

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Development on the CMS covered the basic use-cases for content creation:

  • Create a list of the topics to cover.
  • Assign a topic to contributors and a medical leader.
  • Create a flow where information on the topic could be captured.
  • Provide a visual interface where contributors could ‘build’ out the algorithm.
  • Once the algorithm was completed, have it reviewed and published to the app.

In phase two, the MVP of our CMS allowed us to enter this library of content into our platform. Contributors built out each algorithm and could visually see them as they were pushed to the mobile app. We integrated a feedback loop for contributors and the review process began to formalize. This involved designing out and building in the ability to leave ‘notes’ on the content that was being entered.

 
Image

Design

Image

The Mobile App

Our aim with Openxmed was to ensure that users could navigate through large amounts of content quickly, in a logical order, based on decisions they would make when with a patient.

We established a decision tree model allowing us to layer additional information and references into the content, reducing the cognitive load for the physicians at point-of-care.

Another key component was the ability to comment on the evidence. This proved particularly helpful for the medical students we tested with because it allowed them to connect and engage with peers and with other physicians. Unlike existing clinical decision making tools, engagement between physicians is often missing or it’s an afterthought, which is why we ensured each user had a robust profile, highlighting their specialty or area of practice, their medical interests and where they received their medical degree. These social cues among the medical ‘elite’ are important to ensure the integrity of the platform.

Image

We crafted the onboarding process to verify each user, as the platform is only open to practicing physicians, medical students and residents. This involved making primary fields such as first and last name mandatory and the secondary fields, like phone number (optional). We also made it clear to the user why we were asking for their information, to help them understand that weren’t planning to do anything else other than verify them for our platform.

Image

The Openxmed CMS

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Once we figured out how we were going to help our users navigate medical content from a mobile device at point-of-care, we built out the backend and content delivery platform.

Early on, we opted to roll this out in 2 phases. Since we were already getting interest from physicians and medical students to contribute to the platform, we needed to start the content creation process without a content management system. To do this we used a free online flow diagram tool (draw.io) and a clear format for our content contributors to follow as they embarked on content creation. The objective was to have 100 algorithms completed in 6 months.

Image

Development on the CMS covered the basic use-cases for content creation:

  • Create a list of the topics to cover.
  • Assign a topic to contributors and a medical leader.
  • Create a flow where information on the topic could be captured.
  • Provide a visual interface where contributors could ‘build’ out the algorithm.
  • Once the algorithm was completed, have it reviewed and published to the app.

In phase two, the MVP of our CMS allowed us to enter this library of content into our platform. Contributors built out each algorithm and could visually see them as they were pushed to the mobile app. We integrated a feedback loop for contributors and the review process began to formalize. This involved designing out and building in the ability to leave ‘notes’ on the content that was being entered.